Galway Bay

Course

Galway Bay Golf Resort, Oranmore, County Galway

Founded 1993. Parkland Course

Set on the beautiful Renville Peninsula just outside Galway City, Galway Bay was designed by Christy O’Connor Junior and opened for play in 1993. Not the toughest golf course you will ever play, Galway Bay is still a good challenge with the Atlantic Ocean providing the natural water hazard and the notable absence of trees leaving the course exposed to the elements, in what results in good practice for the links game. It may not be one of the big names of Irish golf but as an arrival day round en-route to Galway or simply for a taste of something different during a trip featuring mostly links courses, Galway Bay is certainly not out of place. It’s also a cost effective option and a good way to offset the costs involved in playing some of the other courses.

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Sightseeing

Sightseeing & Tourist Attractions in West & Northwest Ireland

The main attraction of Ireland as a golf destination may indeed be its great golf courses but the overall experience is influenced by many other factors including great accommodation options, restaurants, pubs, people, and not least it’s stunning scenery and superb visitor attractions. Each region offers something very different and with all locations being quite close together, it’s very easy to mix the stunning countryside and coastline with more urban attractions.

Slieve League Cliffs

We work closely with our clients to recommend what suits their trip best. You may have a full day to spend sightseeing or you may prefer to squeeze in a quick scenic stop on the way to or from the golf course but we will make sure that you maximise your experience at all times. The below is intended as a very general guide to sightseeing in West and Northwest Ireland Ireland.

Often the path less travelled in Ireland, the region has much to offer. Galway is a vibrant city with excellent restaurants, shops and pubs and it’s a great base from which to explore the the area. Moving west towards Connemara and the beautiful town of Clifden, you will encounter some of the most ruggedly beautiful scenery in Ireland and should include a visit to Connemara National Park and take a hike up Diamond Hill. Other recommendations include Kylemore Abbey (pictured below), the scenic Renvyle Peninsula, Aran Islands and the Quiet Man Museum in Cong.

Kylemore Abbey

Travelling north from Connemara, Westport is another lively, picturesque town from where you should make sure to visit Westport House and Gardens, while the more energetic amongst us will enjoy a hike up Croagh Patrick, known as Ireland’s Holy Mountain (pictured below). Another interesting stop is the Ceide Fields Visitor Centre near Ballycastle, while the towering Slieve League Cliffs and Glenveagh National Park should not be missed when in Donegal.

Croagh Parick